A remedy for the FIA superlicence points system

A more sensible order is easy to put together, for example:

GP2/FR3.5: 60, 54, 48, 42, 36, 30, 24, 18, 12, 6
WEC/Indy: 50, 45, 40, 35, 30, 25, 20, 15, 10, 5
GP3/F3/SF: 40, 36, 32, 28, 24, 20, 16, 12, 8, 4
DTM/F.E.: 30, 27, 24, 21, 18, 15, 12, 9, 6, 3 (+ national F3000, e.g. Auto GP)
F3s/FR2.0: 20, 18, 16, 14, 12, 10, 8, 6, 4, 2
F4s/FR1.6: 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1 (+ entry levels, e.g. Toyota Racing Series)

2014 GP2 top 4: Jolyon Palmer, Stoffel Vandoorne, Felipe Nasr, Mitch Evans.
2014 FR3.5 top 4: Carlos Sainz Jr, Roberto Merhi, Pierre Gasly, Oliver Rowland.
2014 GP3 champion: Alex Lynn; 2014 FIA F3 champion: Esteban Ocon.

Eligible from WEC/Indycar/Super Formula: Anthony Davidson, Sebastien Buemi; Andre Lotterer, Benoit Treluyer, Marcel Fassler; Marc Lieb, Romain Dumas, Neel Jani; Will Power, Helio Castroneves, Scott Dixon; Kazuki Nakajima. Notably, 4 are ex-F1 drivers, while Neel Jani was a Red Bull Friday practice driver.

This would mean that the ‘top 10’┬ájunior ladder drivers are always eligible for F1, along with the ‘top 10-12 from other top series’ (another grids worth). Two of the drivers on the juniors list have now moved up to F1, but it could have been more, had money (or the lack of it) not impacted on most of the F1 grid this year.

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